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We'll be revealing the objects and their stories over the course of the year so make sure you visit this page regularly. If you would like to register for email alerts to make sure you don't miss any of our reveals please sign up HERE.

Kindly Light Book

This book explores the history of the charity's founder, Sir Arthur Pearson, and the impact his ideas have had on veterans with sight loss over the last 100 years. 

Click here to read more

If you have any questions, or would like more information about our history, please contact our archives department  archives@blindveterans.org.uk

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1923 London to Brighton 100k Walk Certificate

Our famous London to Brighton 100k walk has been a Blind Veterans UK tradition since 1923.

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Harry O'Hara Tray

A tray made by blind veterans during WWII and embellished by Japanese Fighter Pilot Harry O'Hara

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Henry Allingham Bus

Our oldest veteran to have ever lived had a bus named in his honour in Brighton and Hove

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100k Medals

100k walk medals from 1923 to 2015

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Badges

Blind Veterans UK Badges through the ages

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Kurzweil Machine

The revolutionary Kurzweil machine has a history entwined with our own

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Braille Printer

Braille printers are revolutionary pieces of technology that allow texts to be translated into Braille.

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Screen Reader

Screen reading software both magnifies and read texts to allow blind veterans to read on their computer, use the internet, send emails and magnify documents and letters. 

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Ann Quin staff record

Ann Quin was a Sussex novelist who worked for Blind Veterans UK as a short-hand typist

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Braille Clock

Being able to tell the time without sight is an important step towards independence for the blind.

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The Dance Orchestra

"If people want to hear music - music with a large capital "M" - let them come to St Dunstan's some day.." The Review, 1917

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Signed address from Helen Keller

A signed address by Helen Keller from the World Conference on Work for the Blind. This address was given to Ian Fraser, our chairman at the time who was in attendance at the conference. 

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